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of this transformation is that america's popularity is now soaring. the percent of germans who viewed the u.s. favorably today is 64%, up 31% from 2008 poll. to the pugh, global the u.k., 69%, up from g last year. the french three-quarters, 75% of frenchmen now see america favorably versus 42% in 2008. so what is the big lever that has moved the seesaw of america's popularity so radically upward? acknowledgement of world citizenship? yes. but was it also this public apologetic admission by president obama? >> in america, there's a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges, there have been times where america's showed arrogance and been dismissive, even der rissive. >> question. the u.s. has a long standing tradition of not tritticizeing a former president in front of foreign audiences. did obama violate this protocol using terms like arrogance, dismissive, derisive, pat buchanan? >> yes, he did. i think thats with a mistake, and i think he's been scoring off his country repeatedly abroad,
coverage in america. now, during the pontiac summer closeout. (tucci) count on the nation's fastest 3g network. at&t every head. every bite. every gallon. every shoe. every book. every cereal. well, maybe not every cereal. but every stem. every stitch. every tune. every toy. pretty much everything you buy can help your savings account grow because keep the change from bank of america rounds up every debit card purchase to the next dollar and transfers the difference from your checking to savings account. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. and you know what, it works. nutrisystem for men: flexible new programs personalized to meet your goals. what's great about nutrisystem is you eat the foods you love and you lose weight. i'm dan marino. i lost 22 pounds on nutrisystem and i've kept it off for three years. for a limited time, get an extra three weeks of meals free! that's right, you can get an extra 21 breakfasts, lunches, dinners, desserts, and snacks. that's 105 meals free! i had awesome results. i mean, i lost 22 pounds, my goal was 20,
just did a dvd called rediscovering god in america which includes a section on washington. and i'm very intrigued with the extraordinary job that mount vernon has done in blding a remarkable education center, which i encourage everyone who comes to washington to go see. i would be very tempted someday to write aovel aut washington personally. i think washington's life is so amazing. he is such a personal odyssey in the development of freedom and he's so little understood, but it would be very daunting because washington is maybe the most complex american. i'd be pretty intimidated right now to try to explain his mind and explain how he operated. >> host: we have about 5 minutes left in our first hour of three with author, writer newt gingrich and also former speaker of the house and historian. we're spending three hours talking about his 14 books over his ceer so far. the next telephone call is from jacksonville, florida. you're on the air. >> caller: hello and thank you r c-span and congratulations to brian lamb on his presidential medal of freedom. mr. gingrich, you spoke earlier abou
% unemployment, a banking system that we thought was the pride of america that's now insolvent. the pride of the world in fact that's not basically insolvent except it was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. your reaching or five minutes, mr. madrick. [laughter] >> retail sales even recently kept going down so we are in trouble here. well what would you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. it wasn't capitalism, it wasn't on guided capitalism. it was government that told the berlin and investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities that did not understand. it was government that told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it is government that old people and all of these new mortgage brokers sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand that even when you can't understand them because he will make a lot of money and i can go on and on. >> you can't go on and on. >> i could go on and on a
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
and family of the ladies auxiliary. america honors your service as well. also, governor jan brewer is here of arizona. and mayor phil gordon, our host, here in phoenix. i want too acknowledge president dr. joe shirley jr., president of the navajo nation. and this wasn't on my original card, but this is just an extraordinary story and you may have already heard from her, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank mrs. helen denton, the secretary to dwight eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today and what an extraordinary story that is. so -- [ applause ] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before you as commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. we're joined by some of those who make it the finest force in the world. from luke air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. whether you wear the uniform today or wore it decades ago, you remind us of a fundamental truth. it's not the powerful weapons that make our military the strongest in the world, it's not the sophisticated system that
fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> scottish officials were already under fire even before they made it official yesterday and allowed a convicted terrorist to fly home to libya to die. the outrage only deepened today after these pictures of libyans celebrating abdel baset al megrahi's release were broadcast around the world. al megrahi, of course, was convicted for the 1988 bombing of pan am 103 over lockerbie, scotland. the terror attack killed 270 people. and today, once again, many people were demanding to know just why had he been set free. this matter of justice is once again our "lead focus" tonight. >> reporter: abdel baset al megrahi should not be welcomed back to tripoli, that was the message, the warning to libya from president obama in america. the demand responsible for the deaths of 270 people, the biggest terrorist attack in britain was treated more like a celebrity or royalty changed into a dark suit, he was met off of the plane and then repeatedly hugged by colonel gadhafi's own so
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
managed state in america? did you know that under democratic leadership, seven times, we have been named the best they to do business in america ended june known that we have even been named by education week as the state were a child is most likely to have a successful life? [applause] that is what democratic leadership means. we find solutions to everyday issues that everyday people care about. the want to keep that going? [applause] i want to keep it going because i may not be governor in january but i will still be a virginian. what i know now is that we are in some tough times. this has been the most challenging economy that virginia or the nation has faced since the 1930's. i have had to make some painful decisions as governor but i made the decisions i needed to make to keep virginia moving in the right direction. when you're a governor in tough times, you come to appreciate character of people who can make tough decisions and do the right things to put virginia first and i am here to tell you that i will not lose one second of sleep and in fact i will sleep with a big smile on my
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
with the seawall with his finger. the fable has it parallel in debate on modern values. this time it is america that is trying to put its finger in the dike. to hold back the tide the tide of liberal values spilling over from europe espially from that same small country abutting the north sea with his 16 million dutch citizens. practitioners of a secular values called quote-unquote personal autonomy. the netherlands was the first country to legalize the right to die known as u euthanasia. and dutch has same sex marriage soft drugs, prostitution, and coffee shops that serve hashish. question, are americans destined to take our values cues from the dutch. well jew deyo christian be pushed aside for personal autonomy. is the jesus of bethlehem destined to be side lined by the doctrine and practice of personal autonomy. are we all going dutch? >> we'll ask these experts. paul sar bin, and steven plo ploerow. rabin, and steven ploerow. ploerow. >> plott row. announcer: if. for such a small word, it packs a wallop. if i live to 100. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she say
charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
of america, that is now insolvent. the pride of the world, in fact. it's not basically insolvent. except was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. you're reaching your five minutes. >> retail sales, even recently, kept going down. so we're in some trouble here. what will you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. that it wasn't capitalism. it wasn't unguided capitalism. it was government that did it. it was government that told those brilliant investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities they did not understand. it was government who told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it was government that told people, and all these new mortgage brokers, sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand them, even when you can't understand them. because you'll make a lot of money on it. and i can go on and on, as you all know. >> no, you can't go on and on. you're using up your five minutes. >> you
with america with over 300 million americans you have to pick a handful of big ideas, talk about them and leslie and gradually over time you'll build an effect in a residence and the country it will learn and have a genuine dialogue. >> host: san diego, you are on thair, i like to talk about how the american enterprise institute that mr. gingrich is associated with is highlighted in the book frequently. i would like to address some key aspects that have not been brought up. a first of all, mr. gingrich i it was at a presentation and was unable to ask a questiobecause of the democratic moderator there wouldn't call in may because i had a challenge richard perle the day before about agenda associated with that you. the project with a new american century which has been disbanded only in name only and you are a propagandist of these people. you can't look yourself up in that wall is a book about the power of low lobby called the israel lobby and u.s. foreign policy. there is a media blackout in america. 60 minutes and c is refusing to do a segment on it yet these the esteemed political s
couldn't even vote for a senator if you were an ordinary citizen. so, the struggle foremocracy in america is ongoing. i think theresa is onto something very important. i'm not sure ralph nader is necessarily the best witness for the prosecution, precisely because he did such a brilliant and important job of holding regulatory agencies to account. when he was the g who was a national figure, fighting for those issues. and now that he is -- made himself a presidential candidate he has become unfortunately very in effect tulle in the most important work he has done. t, the -- absolutely, absolutely we need more democracy in america and won't get it until there is serious popular will for that. >> if youook closely at the 1968 election, george wallace got 13.5% of the vote, it was i a good thing for democracy. >> this is an excellent question and when i look ba, third parties in america, most frequently in our century, have been basically formed by southerners, hoping to hold the balance of power in the electoral college co they could basically broker who the president wouldet to be and were
: this is the national desk. they cover america. this is the foreign desk, covering the globe. every picture that comes into fox news channel comes through the media desk. here on "the live desk" those pictures will always be on the right-hand side of the screen. juliet: in the top box we are waiting for president obama to begin speaking in phoenix, talking about the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and as we wait, the health care debate rages on. the president last week said that a public option is an absolute must in any health care bill, but now the white house could be changing its tune. and an update on a story that we broke. e-mails from the white house going to people who never asked for them. now the white house is responding. in the middle box, a tragedy in the sky. fighter jets colliding as they rehearse for an air show. in the bottom box, hurricane season is in full swing. the florida panhandle is dealing with the aftermath of the claudette and now hurricane bill is picking up strength. trace: we begin with health care and the question over president obama's plan for health insurance is dead or
. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrifice to bringabout? >>> how to measure success in america's other warn afanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look a an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in t middle of the war, welcome aboard anir amlance. >>> d germanyants a million ectric vehiclesn the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> fromhe world's leading reporters and analyst here's what's happeni from around the rld. this is "worfocus." made possible, in pa, by th following funder-- major support ha also been provided bthe peter g. peterson foundatio dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibity dddressing key economic allenges facing america's future. >> gd evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if youoke up this mning and turnedn the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement aut what you were hring outf afghanistan and iraq. more tha5,000 american trps have die in those two countries nce troops were ployed to afghanistan in the fall of 2001 and iraq in e spring of 2003. and hune
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
will visit places that have tried this experiment, including states right here in america and you will meet a man and woman whose lives were saved by the current health care system and they say they may not be here if the government controlled health care. >> i promise you, we will pass reform by the end of this year, because the american people need it. sean: president obama has spent the majority of his first year in office attempting to push through a $1 trillion health care initiative aimed at controlling medical costs and extending coverage to millions of uninsured americans. >> if we step back from this challenge at this moment, we are consigning our children to skyrocketing premiums and deficits. sean: after the practice has called for overhaul of the system and the president appears to be making a major concession. >> whether we have it or don't have it is the not the entirety of health care reform. this is one sliver of it. >> i think what is important is choice and competition and i'm convinced at the end of the day the plan will have both of those, but that is not the essential e
... with you. step forward. help renew america at usaservice.org >> goodbye axis of evil and welcome axis of engagement. president obama is attempting to turn adversaries into partners and friends. we went with russia to offers of direct talks with iran to this week's courtship of the syrian dictator and the obama administration is betting that it will improve image in the world and pay dividends for u.s. strach interest and hispanllary clinton said this-- they released them from prison they could benefit. is it diplomacy working and what are we getting in return? dan henninger and matt comiskey. venezuela, iran, syria, burma, russia, what is the big picture goal here of the administration? what are they attempting-- what is president obama trying to get for us? >> i think in coping, to unbush foreign policy that we're going to talk to the people that don't like us and that like them and a difficult relationship and this ye year-- engage them. >> but for the sake of not being bush, i mean, certain, surely there's got to be a larger strategy at work ear? >> it's hard to tell so far. becaus
into a motion picture from warner brothers. its subject is america after an electromagnetic pulse attack. thank you again for being here. good to see you. >> thank you. >> i'm afraid there are many people waveng who perhaps don't know what an electromagnetic pulse attack would be. maybe we'd start with your explaining that attack. >> it's a byproduct of any detonation of any nuclear weapon. first realizing some testing in the '60s and before we go any further, i know this sounds like sci-fi. so you in the audience, folks watching this later -- if this sounds like sci-fi, this evening go on the internet, google up emp, go to wikipedia. here's a couple of other things you should look up. starfish crime which was the american test in 1962 of detonating a weapon in space which blew out a fair part of the power grid in hawaii. also look up soviet test 184. and then finally if you want to look at a completely different aspect of emp look up the carrington event which was actually triggered by a solar storm. and to go back to answering your question, emp, electromagnetic pulse, is a byproduct of deton
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
auxiliary. americana's your service as well. -- america honors your service as well. the governor of arizona is here as well. and mayor phil gordon, our host in phoenix. i want to acknowledge the president of the navajo nation. this was not on my original card, but you may have already heard from our, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank the secretary to eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today, and what an extraordinary story that is. [applause] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before u.s. commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. [applause] we are joined by some of those who made it the finest force in the world. from the air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. [applause] whether you wear the uniform today or war decades ago -- more expected to go, you are symbols of a fundamental truth is not powerful epidemic are military the strongest in the world, not the sophisticated systems that make us the most to danced. the true strength of our military lies in the spirit an
home training. immigration reform? this question came via e-mail at america's voice. during 2008, latino voters played and historic role turning four stage from red to blue. it's a defining issue for latino voters and president obama campaigned on a promise for this. how is he going to get comprehensive immigration reform done now. we've seen the dates flip a bit. what's doing on? >> what the president said throughout the campaign and in office is we have to have comprehensive immigration reform. my top person who is head of international governmental affairs, the question she asked before joining the administration is, is the president committed this and he absolutely is and he's pulled together members of congress, those who are supported of immigration reform and those who are not, brought them together in the white house and began to dialogue. we have someone working hard on the hill to see what measures we can do in the short-term but the real solution is long-term immigration reform. you mentioned the date has slipped. obviously there's a full plate but i think the preside
of the rest of europe. welcome to "bbc worldews" broadcast to our viewers opbs in america also around the globe. cong up later for you, the rce of iran's fead be senged you militia. have an intervi with a former memr. anit's fewell to a pioer of roc music, the guitast les paul has died. hello. e u.s. governmt is making its view very clear. the man serving a lifesentence a jailf the bombing of a pa am jet should note releas early. he has ternal proste cancer. he could be freed next week on compasonate grounds. he served eightears of his sentence. the b correspondentllen little reported back othe saster in 1988. he has returnedo lockerbie now. >> t whole sky just lit up d it was le liquid fire starteto rain down on the car. >> like a atom bomb going off. it was a rrific mhroom of flames. >> i lost my broer-in-law, my sier-in-law. >> it was d winter, the longest ght of th yr. one ur into its flight. thpan am jumbo jet fell ou of the cd sky, the biggest mass murr in british history. he w sentenced to lif for plantinghe bomb i now likely to be releaseds early as next ek o compassionate gro
to the vfw on america's two foreign wars and the troops who are fighting them. you'll see it live right here in the "newsroom.." >>> two and a half months in the hurricane sen and bill and claude it light up the radar. hello, everyone. i'm kieyra phillips. you're live here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> and they fought for you. who fights for them. american veterans focused health care. we're pushing forward on both fronts. a live address to the vfw in this hour and a congressional session of conservative opponents to the health plan. you know we've covered their causes and criseses to tainted equipment at v.a. hospitals. there are people stories, not number stories. we can't ignore numbers like these. almost a million unprocessed claims. if claims are denied it can take a year and a half, sometimes much longer to go through the appeals. factor in a passionate fight to overhaul the nation's health care system and this becomes the scene outside president's adegree. cnn's ed henry joins me live. how does it push into this for reform? we sure know they want it.
looked around and i saw america. i saw white people and i saw black people. and i saw men and i saw women and i saw english-speakers and spanish-speakers in our caucus. our diversity is our strength. and when you have a diverse group the way you create solidarity is through shared values. the kind of discussion we have when a vote comes up that seems like a tough vote for me because the way my district is or because i just have problems with them on the basis of conscience, the discussion is always on the level of what's right, what's good, what's right, never, what's in it for me, what's in it for the leadership? it never takes that kind of turn. and the democrats don't vote as a single bloc and some close and some unpredictable. we had a couple that took a long time to vote. but the net result of that is that through our diversity, we have our strength. now, you compare that to the other side which seems to operate on completely different principles. doesn't have anything even remotely resembling diversity in our caucus and it seems to fight the very idea of diversity. i remember one si
viewers on pbs in america also around the globe. coming up later for you, the force of iran's feared be seeinged you militia. we have an interview with a former member. and it's farewell to a pioneer of rock music, the guitarist les paul has died. hello. the u.s. government is making its view very clear. the man serving a life sentence in a jail of the bombing of a pan am jet should not be released early. he has terminal prostate cancer. he could be freed next week on compassionate grounds. he served eight years of his sentence. the bbc correspondent allen little reported back on the disaster in 1988. he has returned to lockerbie now. >> the whole sky just lit up and it was like liquid fire started to rain down on the car. >> like an atom bomb going off. it was a terrific mushroom of flames. >> i lost my brother-in-law, my sister-in-law. >> it was mid winter, the longest night of the year. one hour into its flight. the pan am jumbo jet fell out of the cold sky, the biggest mass murder in british history. he was sentenced to life for planting the bomb is now likely to be released as e
for "newsweek" and chris of it, the deputy chief editor of the france press america wire service. john, let's start with you. critics of the review are sort of dismissing it already out of hand saying it is merely a budget drill and something that will define major budget cuts that will come down the pipe. is that fair? because there are hints we will get strategy out of this. aren't we? >> yes. i think the criticism is that it should be a budget drill. strategy review if it's untethered to the resources. i think it's likely to be more interesting than the last couple. because it does seem to be grappling with two separate problems. on two separate time frames. and the big problem out is the way is a european competitor, china that nobody talks about that. if so what do you do? how do you prepare? out there is the biggy. in the mean time there are the future of these mete wars. like iraq, afghanistan. and the future of what we call the global commons like piracy. which requires. >> and -- >> add stuff but my sense is that the two drivers in terms of project and force numbers are the ones i
the money comes from. >> federal aid? >> how is c-span funded? america's cable companies created c-span is that public service, a private business initiative -- no government mandate, no government money. . >> the main opposition party has a shadow team or shadow cabinet who breach the main government ministers. you haven't foreign secretary and in the shadow foreign secretary in the conservative opposition. it is his job to challenge him, question the foreign secretary, and potentially would hold the position of foreign secretary if he were elected in the next general election. >> most of the recent polls show the conservative party with a 15% lead. what role is foreign policy playing in british politics right now? >> foreign-policy has been high on the agenda because of their commitment currently in afghanistan, and before that, in iraq. the positions of the two main parties have not been hugely different. on both sides of the political divide, what you are going to see is a much greater degree of caution about taking on major overseas military ahead. you are going to see pressur
are no longer america. simple as that. >> host: of the great ironies here, the founding fathers, the reason they began this space experiment was based on two things, freedom of worship and freedom of speech. and this is why it is so vital to protect talk radio and in particular conservative talk radio. >> guest: the government has no right to sit in the editor's chair or to control content through regulation, period. >> host: this is about protecting the first amendment, our bill of rights and great constitution. brian jennings, thank you for joining me today. >> guest: thank you. >> host: the book is called quote go censorship the threat to silence talk radio the new fairness doctrine exposed." the author is brian jennings. i am monica crowley. thank you so much for being with us today. .. >> i guess i thought i would talk or a bid to while some they also like to do we have a small group feel free to fill in but how many of you watch cnbc? many if you are cnbc viewers we may have a pretty educated viewership so i am curious five like to do this in small groups or large groups how many of y
doing well.. bank of america announcing a $33 million settlement with the s.e.c. over allegations about how they reported the bank of america merrill lynch bonuses deal. that stock is trading up. a brilliant series of commentaries in the middle of the day from bank of america on the cyclicals. the weak dollar you see here. breakout. these are essentially new highs going back to september or october for most of the major cyclical names here. on the autos, ford's at a new high, toyota motors also at the highest since september. and even the car dealers are doing better today. look at sonic automotive. all the car dealers are up. you know what's not doing well in the auto group? anything that's like those replacement parts like auto zone. they were doing better when the sales were terrible. now sales are doing a little bit better they're a little weaker here today. take a look at the defensive names.s. the only groups holding back here is your classic pepsis and colgates, your heinzes as well. we had comments from clorox this morning that were a little disappointing. finally, here's the b
in america because that was right up to the time i finished writing the book. so i think anybody that reads inside the beltway i see that you have a paperback copy, it's on paperback now, will find a lot of humor is true tales that have been told inside washington that they will not have read anywhere else and just like "weed man" i picked out the finest stories like with the stored marijuana in the basements of churches and got more room on the island with 40,000 pounds of wheat and build a house out of the bales and i try to bring some humor to the beat which is what i've done. >> host: john, thank you very much. i've enjoyed this discussion and urge the few words to take a fresh look at marijuana smuggling and read "weed man." >> guest: thank you. i appreciate that very much. .. >> the soviet army and task forces in 1991 since published in russia in his book the icebreaker and in this book he argues a widely accepted theory regarding the origins of world war ii were erroneous. in his new book, it "the chief culprit" stalin's grand design to start world war ii" dr. suvorov furthers his id
this experiment, including states right here in america and you will meet a man and woman whose lives were saved by the current health care system and they say they may not be here if the government controlled health care. >> i promise you, we will pass reform by the end of this year, because the american people need it. sean: president obama has spent the majority of his first year in office attempting to push through a $1 trillion health care initiative aimed at controlling medical costs and extending coverage to millions of uninsured americans. >> if we step back from this challenge at this moment, we are consigning our children to skyrocketing premiums and deficits. sean: after the practice has called for overhaul of the system and the president appears to be making a major concession. >> whether we have it or don't have it is the not the entirety of health care reform. this is one sliver of it. >> i think what is important is choice and competition and i'm convinced at the end of the day the plan will have both of those, but that is not the essential element. sean: what caused the white hou
america's image in the world, that before we're seeing it as a standoffish nation and now we're the nice guys and in terms of getting a return on this investment in the-- in policy, i don't see that at least on the results so far, you don't really see what they aim to get from russia. >> niceness has never delivered a lot of foreign policy that i can observe. >> i think that the obama administration calculus is that america's problem, foreign policy in the bush years was fundamentally a public relations problem. and to some extent that's true. we did have a big pr problem in europe for example in canada and a big pr problem in much of the arab world and that would make it harder for those leaders to back the kind of thing we wanted to do. >> precisely and the argument to the extent that we want to relieve this, maybe we can unlock a whole other set of issues and make some movement with the arab-- the israelis. >> that's on. >> and that's an argument for winning over the people of paris, that's not an argument for getting anything from our adversaries in tehran. >> that's precisely it. an
is the biotech company up by around 2% and that's after analysts at bank of america and merrill lynch upgraded that stock to overweight from underweight and increased the company's price starting. we are watching ubs. that stock is lower, in line with the rest of the financials here in zurich. we are expecting the deal with the u.s. to be signed in washington later on today. that's when we may get some more details out on the settlement and sales including how many client names will be handed over to the u.s. authorities. there's a possibility of when the swiss government will sell its stake in ubs. ubs authorities have said they're preparing criminal investigations into 150 ubs clients in the u.s. and the wall street journal is reporting that up to 10 swiss and european banks among them. chris swiss and julius bear were identified in the ubs tax probe. that's after ubs clients in the u.s. have come forward and disclosed their ubs accounts, also other foreign accounts and they have said that they're with either credit suisse or other banks. but that doesn't necessarily mean that those banks wi
about $13 million collectively if they would go on a tour, a ten-city tour of america, and then there's an option to have some concert ins europe. >> it's very interesting. we have the graphic up here, who gets paid what. can they do this tour without janet jackson? >> well, i think it's a whole lot less valuable. janet jackson, the baby of the family, ironically now, has taken the position of michael in the family. she is the primary bread winner, as was he in his heyday. no, i think that it would be greatly diminished if janet did not join, and i'm hearing she's a little reluctant. >> she's reluctant. why would she be reluctant? >> because that puts her in the spot that her big brother michael was in all those years, which was to be the one to be pestered, let's go on concert tour. let's go on tour because we, the brothers, need money. >> right. >> i think la toya saved her money pretty well, but the brothers did not. >> right. we hear rumors that there is this sort of not particularly -- there is some serious sibling rivalry going on behind the scenes in terms of how this potential
: president obama responded it is true. you cannot cover all the uninsured in america for three. he reiterated its promise to completely avoid raising taxes on those who earn less than 1/4 of a million dollars per year. the president has an answer. >> 2/3 of the money we can obtain just by eliminating waste and inefficiencies. the congressional budget office agreed with that, which is not something i am making up. republicans do not dispute it. the other 1/3 we would have to find additional revenue, but it would not come on the backs of the middle-class. shepard: the president said he appreciated the question and "the respectful way in which the man asked it." a nod to the reality that the meetings have become difficult at times. major garrett, there has been talk that things might get a little more rowdy. >> the audience here was first- come, first-served, unlike in new hampshire, which was by lottery. some people slept out overnight to make sure they got into the auditorium. the town is just outside of a big city in montana. the state has been trending democratic of late. the questions the p
daughter had achieved. what a great story it is for america. and what a great story it is that president obama would give us a chance to consider judge sotomayor to serve as the first hispanic woman on the united states supreme court. for many who oppose judge sotomayor, her life achievements and her judicial record are just not good enough. after pouring over 3,000 court decisions and hundreds of her speeches, judge sotomayor's critics focus their opposition primarily, not exclusively, but primarily on one case, the rich ricci and one sentence from one speech. i hope someone was keeping track how many times those three words, wise latina woman, were quoted during the course of this hearing. senator after senator asked her what did you really, really, really mean with those three words? over and over and over again. we are senators who live in a world of decisions and votes everyday. and we understand when our decisions and votes are questioned and challenged often in a an unfair fashion. if we vote in a way that's controversial we ask that people be fair and judge us on our life's work,
estate market. had no government entity existed when private mortgage capital tried up and 2008, america's housing market would have come to a complete halt throwing out -- throwing our needs the commission into a deeper recession. we need only look at the current status of the if affairs in the commercial and mortgage market to see how different things might be today in the tradition -- if the traditional -- if the traditional regular mortgage market without fannie may and freddie mac. for those reasons realtors believe pure privatisation of the gse is unacceptable. rather, we support a secondary mortgage market model that includes some level of government participation, protect the taxpayers and ensures all creditworthy consumers have reasonable access to affordable mortgage capital. nar is currently conducting research to determine what model for the secondary mortgage market would best achieve these goals. we will share that information with you as soon as it is completed. for now, i would like to briefly outline a set of nine principles that nar's board of directors has adopted and
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
. j. o'rourke examined america's love affair with cars which he believes has contributed to its cultural decline. the automotive museum in los angeles hosted this event, it is 45 minutes. >> i want to thank you for coming to this book signing. i am the director of the museum here. earnings is an honor for me personally as well as the museum. .. >> pretty well rounded writer and what i love most about him is his ear refer vans and the way he turns a phrase and honest to god, i twant say it, it's the truth he is by far my favorite author and i have all of his box and the first part of the book it lists all the books he has written and i think 3 or 4 of them are "new york times" best-seller books, and, if you hand read "parliament at wars" or "give war a chance" or "all the trouble in the world" read those books and what is interesting about pj and, interesting in the book, and one of my question to him later, are they going to make a movie about your book, a lot of stuff he talks about, that goes back to the '70s and '80s is as true today as it was then and you keep reading the st
? and then you wonder why a politician can score points with crowds in south america by claiming to stand up to the damn yankees. there is this heritage of there. i don't know if this country will ever be able to overcome this fear and suspicion, considering that the war was bad enough what went on for the next 150 years. you know, an old world power politics termed the united states is the natural hegemon of the western hemisphere. it is the most powerful economically, militarily. but you don't have to act like. and in the long run it's a losing thing. the sun has set on the british empire, for instance. >> what would be your view of the intercontinental north to south road -- >> everything i know about that, there's some misbegotten highway structure construction projects that will probably never get off the ne. >> would you say it's so embedded and not to be forgotten by the south or mexico? i don't ever see harmony coming out of the. >> well, i would think so. i like mexico. it's a country with a sad, sad history. it started out almost without chance. so did the other latin america count
that united america. after sputnik, we went to pick the moon. ronald reagan rally in the country to end communism. you can think of george bush's cry in 2001 that we would defeat -- lead a global war on terrorism and extremism. it is interesting, the last one, the war on terrorism seems to have lost some of that national feeling. when you do polling, you see people not as invested in the success of afghanistan and iraq and other places where we are fighting were secretly, such as the horn of africa. yet in our strategic interest, clearly fighting terrorism will remain the big issue. he what is the next big national issue? what can president obama defined as the national agenda? he tried very much to make health care that. in the last press conference he said it is intimately tied to your own personal future as an american. but we have not seen americans rally around that idea yet as a national cause. this is something president obama and his allies will try to do. he will try to cast the health care debate as important as going to the moon or defeating communism or terrorism you will se
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